The Who - Who's Next


Format: Standard Price
Precio:
Precio de venta£22.00

Descripción

Who's Next is the fifth studio album by English rock band the Who. It developed from the aborted Lifehouse project, a multi-media rock opera written by the group's Pete Townshend as a follow-up to the band's 1969 album Tommy. The project was cancelled owing to its complexity and to conflicts with Kit Lambert, the band's manager, but the group salvaged some of the songs, without the connecting story elements, to release as their next album. Eight of the nine songs on Who's Next were from Lifehouse, the lone exception being the John Entwistle-penned "My Wife". Ultimately, the remaining Lifehouse tracks would all be released on other albums throughout the next decade.

Read More: Why John Lennon Sometimes Sounded So Lost on 'Walls and Bridges' | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/john-lennon-walls-and-bridges/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_med

Re

 

A Collection of Great Dance Songs is a compilation album by English rock band Pink Floyd. It was released on 23 November 1981 in the United Kingdom by Harvest Records and in the United States by Columbia Record

A Collection of Great Dance Songs was released on Nov. 23, 1981, in the U.S. (it was also issued in the U.K. by Harvest). While the compilation became Pink Floyd’s worst-charting LP in the States since 1972 – and its worst-to-date overseas – the album has gone multi-platinum over the years. The release has largely been supplanted by Pink Floyd collections released in the digital era.

In an ironic twist, the album that was designed as a basic introduction to Pink Floyd has become a must-have for hardcore Pink Floyd completists. A Collection of Great Dance Songs remains the only release that contains the unique edit of “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” as well as Gilmour’s solo studio version of “Money.”



Read More: How Pink Floyd's 'Great Dance Songs' Became a Collector's Item | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/pink-floyd-collection-of-great-dance-songs/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

A Collection of Great Dance Songs was released on Nov. 23, 1981, in the U.S. (it was also issued in the U.K. by Harvest). While the compilation became Pink Floyd’s worst-charting LP in the States since 1972 – and its worst-to-date overseas – the album has gone multi-platinum over the years. The release has largely been supplanted by Pink Floyd collections released in the digital era.

In an ironic twist, the album that was designed as a basic introduction to Pink Floyd has become a must-have for hardcore Pink Floyd completists. A Collection of Great Dance Songs remains the only release that contains the unique edit of “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” as well as Gilmour’s solo studio version of “Money.”



Read More: How Pink Floyd's 'Great Dance Songs' Became a Collector's Item | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/pink-floyd-collection-of-great-dance-songs/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

A Collection of Great Dance Songs was released on Nov. 23, 1981, in the U.S. (it was also issued in the U.K. by Harvest). While the compilation became Pink Floyd’s worst-charting LP in the States since 1972 – and its worst-to-date overseas – the album has gone multi-platinum over the years. The release has largely been supplanted by Pink Floyd collections released in the digital era.

In an ironic twist, the album that was designed as a basic introduction to Pink Floyd has become a must-have for hardcore Pink Floyd completists. A Collection of Great Dance Songs remains the only release that contains the unique edit of “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” as well as Gilmour’s solo studio version of “Money.”



Read More: How Pink Floyd's 'Great Dance Songs' Became a Collector's Item | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/pink-floyd-collection-of-great-dance-songs/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

A Collection of Great Dance Songs was released on Nov. 23, 1981, in the U.S. (it was also issued in the U.K. by Harvest). While the compilation became Pink Floyd’s worst-charting LP in the States since 1972 – and its worst-to-date overseas – the album has gone multi-platinum over the years. The release has largely been supplanted by Pink Floyd collections released in the digital era.

In an ironic twist, the album that was designed as a basic introduction to Pink Floyd has become a must-have for hardcore Pink Floyd completists. A Collection of Great Dance Songs remains the only release that contains the unique edit of “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” as well as Gilmour’s solo studio version of “Money.”



Read More: How Pink Floyd's 'Great Dance Songs' Became a Collector's Item | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/pink-floyd-collection-of-great-dance-songs/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

A Collection of Great Dance Songs was released on Nov. 23, 1981, in the U.S. (it was also issued in the U.K. by Harvest). While the compilation became Pink Floyd’s worst-charting LP in the States since 1972 – and its worst-to-date overseas – the album has gone multi-platinum over the years. The release has largely been supplanted by Pink Floyd collections released in the digital era.

In an ironic twist, the album that was designed as a basic introduction to Pink Floyd has become a must-have for hardcore Pink Floyd completists. A Collection of Great Dance Songs remains the only release that contains the unique edit of “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” as well as Gilmour’s solo studio version of “Money.”



Read More: How Pink Floyd's 'Great Dance Songs' Became a Collector's Item | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/pink-floyd-collection-of-great-dance-songs/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

A Collection of Great Dance Songs was released on Nov. 23, 1981, in the U.S. (it was also issued in the U.K. by Harvest). While the compilation became Pink Floyd’s worst-charting LP in the States since 1972 – and its worst-to-date overseas – the album has gone multi-platinum over the years. The release has largely been supplanted by Pink Floyd collections released in the digital era.

In an ironic twist, the album that was designed as a basic introduction to Pink Floyd has become a must-have for hardcore Pink Floyd completists. A Collection of Great Dance Songs remains the only release that contains the unique edit of “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” as well as Gilmour’s solo studio version of “Money.”



Read More: How Pink Floyd's 'Great Dance Songs' Became a Collector's Item | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/pink-floyd-collection-of-great-dance-songs/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=r

A Collection of Great Dance Songs was released on Nov. 23, 1981, in the U.S. (it was also issued in the U.K. by Harvest). While the compilation became Pink Floyd’s worst-charting LP in the States since 1972 – and its worst-to-date overseas – the album has gone multi-platinum over the years. The release has largely been supplanted by Pink Floyd collections released in the digital era.

In an ironic twist, the album that was designed as a basic introduction to Pink Floyd has become a must-have for hardcore Pink Floyd completists. A Collection of Great Dance Songs remains the only release that contains the unique edit of “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” as well as Gilmour’s solo studio version of “Money.”



Read More: How Pink Floyd's 'Great Dance Songs' Became a Collector's Item | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/pink-floyd-collection-of-great-dance-songs/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=

Payment & Security

American Express Apple Pay Diners Club Discover Google Pay Maestro Mastercard PayPal Shop Pay Visa

Su información de pago se procesa de forma segura. No almacenamos los detalles de la tarjeta de crédito ni tenemos acceso a la información de su tarjeta de crédito.

Gastos estimados de envío

You may also like

Recently viewed